Poetry Friday: The Mortimer Minute Children’s Poetry Blog Hop

September 27, 2013 34 Comments by Renee M. LaTulippe

Hello, hoppers! It’s time for another episode of

The Mortimer Minute badge

[Silent nibbling]!

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Mortimer says he’s happy to be here at No Water River, where the greens are lush and no one chases him away with a rake. Granted, he’s a little miffed that I don’t have quite the carrot stash that Janet Wong offered him last week, but he’s making do with some spinach tortelli and a veggie pizza.

So this is the Children’s Poetry Blog Hop. A sincere tail quiver to Janet for tagging me last week! This week, I’m tagging the three lovely bunnies you see at the bottom of the page, whose posts will go up next week.

Here’s how to hop “Mortimer Minute” style!

  • Answer 3 questions. Pick one question from the previous Hopper. Add two of your own. Keep it short, please! This is a Blog Hop, not a Blog Long Jump. This is The Mortimer Minute—not The Mortimer Millennium!
  • Invite friends. Invite 1-3 bloggers who love children’s poetry to follow you. They can be writers, teachers, librarians, or just plain old poetry lovers.
  • Say thank you. In your own post, link to The Previous Hopper. Then keep The Mortimer Minute going — let us know who your Hoppers are and when they plan to post their own Mortimer Minute.

Ready?

Mortimer: Is there a children’s poem that you wish you had written?
RML: I suppose “all of them” would be too broad…? So I’ll pull something from my bedside table, which is currently Karla Kuskin’s Moon, Have You Met My Mother? There are no titles, so let’s call it “There’s a Tree by the Meadow.”

THERE’S A TREE BY THE MEADOW

There’s a tree by the meadow
by the sand by the sea
on a hillock near a valley
that belongs to me
with small spring leaves
like small green dimes
that cast their shadows on the grass
a thousand separate times
with round brown branches
like outstretched sleeves
and the twigs come out as fingers
and the fingers hold the leaves
with blossoms here and there
and always pink and soft and stout
and when the blossoms disappear
the apples hurry out
and
in the middle of the blossoms
in the center of the tree
with a hat and coat of leaves on
sits smiling me.

Karla Kuskin signature

 

 

Mortimer: What are your biggest struggles or obstacles as a writer?
RML: Writing. Time. Not being prolific. Knowing that sitting down to write a poem means subjecting myself to prolonged mental torture, except when it doesn’t. Procrastination. Confidence. Fear. Feeling already too far behind to ever catch up. Time.

Mortimer: Who encouraged you to write poetry?
RML: That would be Mrs. Patricia Musser, my 11th grade English teacher. I wrote my first poem when I was seven and never stopped, so Mrs. Musser didn’t have to twist my arm to also take her creative writing class. She was the advisor for the school’s literary magazine, The Bubblegum Overture, and made me editor for my junior and senior years. I spent endless hours typing poems for the anonymous voting sessions, and writing more free verse than any one person should write…plus that one sonnet that was so inscrutable that everyone agreed it must be brilliant. I still have the literary magazines, and the poems I wrote make me cringe. They are truly awful. I don’t know why she encouraged me to write! When I graduated, Mrs. Musser gave me the complete works of Sylvia Plath. The woman really knew me.

That’s it for my Mortimer Minute! (You didn’t really think I could keep it to a minute, did you?) Now let me introduce you to the Hoppers who will follow me with The Mortimer Minute at their blogs next week!

Julie LariosJULIE LARIOS

…teaches on the faculty of the Vermont College of Fine Arts in their MFA Writing for Children program. She has published four books of poetry for children: On the Stairs, Have You Ever Done That?, Yellow Elephant: A Bright Bestiary (Boston Globe-Horn Book Honors (Awards), and Imaginary Menagerie: A Book of Curious Creatures. She is the winner of a Pushcart Prize and has been included twice in the annual Best American Poetry series for her poetry for adults, and was granted a fellowship by the Washington State Arts Commission/Artist Trust. Recent poems for children have appeared in several anthologies. Visit Julie at her blog The Drift Record.

BJLEEB.J. LEE

…has 50 poems published in anthologies and magazines. Three of her poems were nominated for the Rhysling Award and appear in The Rhysling Anthology 2011, 2012, and 2013. Additional anthology credits include In the Garden of the Crow and And the Crowd Goes Wild!: A Global Gathering of Sports Poems. Her magazine credits include Highlights for Children, The SCBWI Bulletin, Spellbound, and many others. BJ received a Certificate of Merit from SCBWI for her poem “The Legend of the Flying Dutchman.” She has numerous polished picture book manuscripts as well as a polished YA novel in her portfolio. B.J. earned a M.S. in Library and Information Science from Simmons College in Boston and a B.A. in English. Learn more at www.childrensauthorbjlee.com.

laura-purdie-salasLAURA PURDIE SALAS

…is the author of more than 100 books for kids, including BookSpeak!: Poems About Books (Minnesota Book Award, NCTE Notable, Bank Street Best Books, Cybils Winner, and more), A Leaf Can Be . . . (NCTE Notable, IRA Teachers’ Choice, Banks Street Best Books, SCBWI Golden Kite Honor Book, Riverby Nature Award, and more), and the forthcoming Water Can Be…. She likes to write all kinds of stuff, but poetry is her favorite. She loves to introduce kids to poetry and help them find poems they can relate to, no matter what their age, mood, and personality. See more about Laura and her work at www.laurasalas.com.

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Four paws up!

 Poetry Bunny Amy Ludwig VanDerwater has the roundup today at The Poem Farm. Don’t forget your head of lettuce!

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32 Comments

  1. Teresa Robeson
    4 years ago

    Fun Mortimer Minute…hilarious answers, Renee! I love that Karla Kushkin poem and now must search for her “Moon, Have You Met My Mother” book.

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      Alas, it’s out of print, but you can get it used! It’s full of goodness.

      Reply

  2. Catherine Johnson
    4 years ago

    That was fun and that poem you chose is so beautiful!

    Reply

  3. Irene Latham
    4 years ago

    Renee, you have a way with rabbits. 🙂 Love the poem so much. I need to spend some more time with Karla’s work. Thank you!

    Reply

  4. jama
    4 years ago

    Great silent nibbling!

    Fun post. That Mortimer sure gets around :).

    Reply

  5. Andromeda Jazmon
    4 years ago

    I love that Karla Kuskin poem. This is such a fun meme! I am really enjoying it.

    Reply

  6. B.J. Lee
    4 years ago

    Lots of fun, Renee! I love that Karla Kuskin poem. So how did you get her autograph? There’s a story in that, I’m sure. But most of all, good questions!

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      I don’t have her autograph – I found it online. Gotta love the Internet!

      Reply

  7. Michelle Heidenrich Barnes
    4 years ago

    Thank you for introducing me to a new friend today– Karla Kuskin. Delightful! I also could really relate to your answer for question #2. Time is most definitely my bogeyman too.

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      Karla Kuskin is amazing. We will be featuring her in a few weeks for the Spotlight on NCTE Poets series!

      Reply

  8. Liz Steinglass
    4 years ago

    Fun. I bet Mortimer likes that poem too.

    Reply

  9. Janet Wong
    4 years ago

    Wow, Renee–that post was packed with Vitamin A!!! And if there’s anyone who knows how to squeeze value out of time, it’s you–I don’t know how you do all that you do, including sewing stunning superhero capes!

    Reply

  10. Patricia Tilton
    4 years ago

    Beautiful poem — peaceful and full of imagery! I always find it soothing when I stop by here.

    Reply

  11. Renee M. LaTulippe
    4 years ago

    Aw, what a nice thing to say, Patricia! I’m glad No Water River has this effect on you. 🙂

    Reply

  12. Laura Shovan
    4 years ago

    We’re so often warned off preposition strings in so-called good writing, but the technique works beautifully in the opening of this poem. I’m looking forward to more posts in this hop!

    Reply

  13. Matt Forrest
    4 years ago

    The rabbit gets spinach tortelli?? Then I want to have a Matt Forrest Minute! Fun post, Renee…thanks for letting me know I’m not alone in my struggles as a writer!

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      Come on over, Matt! Tomorrow it’s tortelli with pancetta and parmesan! It eases the struggles a bit.

      Reply

  14. Joanna
    4 years ago

    Mortimer is a cool interviewer! And I guess you picked this delightful poem for him, right?

    Reply

  15. Linda Baie
    4 years ago

    I love Karla Kuskin, so you stopped me at the beginning with your minute, Renee. She just does so much that is wonderful: “and when the blossoms disappear/the apples hurry out” And thanks for the answers. I think teachers (including me) like to encourage and see that one line, even word, that means talent later! I imagine your teachers saw that in you. You are lucky to have such encouraging teachers. Thanks for the “extra” in the bios too-glad to know! (See you one the screen next week!)

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      “the apples hurry out” is my favorite part too, Linda. I was lucky indeed to have Mrs. Musser. Obviously, I’ve never forgotten her.

      Reply

  16. Susanna Leonard Hill
    4 years ago

    Love your Mortimer Minute answers, Renee – you are so funny 🙂 And you have tagged some of my favorite poet-types to go next 🙂 And your obstacles? Well, clearly we are twins separated at birth. That’s all I can say 🙂

    Reply

  17. Myra from GatheringBooks
    4 years ago

    Lovely to see this poetry hop via the dashing Mortimer. 🙂 I smiled when you mentioned ‘time’ being one of your struggles. I have a book club for young readers here in Singapore (9-12 yo), and we talked about Gaiman’s Ocean at the End of the Lane. One of the questions I asked these young kids was what they think grown-ups are most afraid of. And one of them (my eleven year old daughter actually) said “time. grown-ups are afraid of time running out before they can make something of their lives. not living a life of meaning.” 🙂

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      4 years ago

      Ack! She nailed it, didn’t she. I feel a little depressed now! 😉

      Reply

    • Janet Wong
      4 years ago

      Wow, Myra: that young reader is a DEEP thinker. I think you need to pull a “Mrs.Musser” on her–that girl is going places!

      Reply

  18. Amy Ludwig VanDerwater
    4 years ago

    I hope that Mrs. Patricia Musser has seen this post. Any teacher would be proud to have encouraged you, Renee. Thank you for another great post and for this Karla poem and for your true words. You use your time very well; be good to Renee, and happy PF!

    Reply

  19. Tara Smith
    4 years ago

    Loved this minute with Mortimer – and the Karla Kuskin poem. And thanks for the interview, too – I always learn so much from these writer interviews.

    Reply

  20. Erik - This Kid Reviews Books
    4 years ago

    I know I wasn’t tagged, but to answer the first question, I would say “Edgar Allen Poe’s poem, The Raven” I had to answer that. 🙂 Great answers! 😀

    Reply

  21. Robyn Hood Black
    4 years ago

    I’m late hopping over, but thanks for sharing, Renee! That Karla Kuskin poem whisked me DIRECTLY back to my childhood, and up my favorite climbing tree.

    I don’t think you (any of us) get to the good writing until after early years of some dreadful sonnets… ;0) Perceptive teacher, that Ms. Musser. (I had one of those too, early on.)

    Reply

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