Spotlight on NCTE Poets: Joyce Sidman, with Lee Bennett Hopkins

October 25, 2016 18 Comments by Renee M. LaTulippe

NCTE-featured-sidman

“Poetry… is a sculpture of words…”

NCTE Medal - designed by Karla Kuskin

Welcome to the seventeenth episode of SPOTLIGHT ON NCTE POETS! The videos in this series with Lee Bennett Hopkins are brief and personal looks at all the recipients of the NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children.

This series isn’t about analyzing the poets and their work, but rather about preserving Lee’s personal recollections, insights, and memories of each of these amazing people. Through these short interviews, we hope to foster an appreciation of the poets and their work by “reading it and loving it from the heart,” as Lee says.

This installment brings us to a poet known for her keen and gentle observations of nature and all the lovely creatures that inhabit our world.

Joyce Sidman

bio-pic-sidman

In 2013, Joyce Sidman became the seventeenth recipient of the NCTE award. As Joyce explains on her website, “From early on, I felt compelled to write. I think a lot of writers are like this. Writing helps us understand the world; we’d be lost without it. I got interested in writing for children after I had my two sons and read them wonderful books every day.”

And aren’t we glad she did! Joyce bounded onto the children’s poetry scene in 2000 with her first collection, Just Us Two: Poems about Animal Dads. And right off the bat, she seemed to have found her nonfiction nature niche…  (Click on pics to enlarge and read).

spread1-ustwo

…that has continued to delight and inform young readers for the past sixteen years (and counting)! As Lee notes in the video, Joyce’s career soared, and in the span of a decade she became one of our most prominent and beloved children’s poets.

To inject a personal note, Joyce is one of the first poets I read and studied when I began writing for children, and it is no exaggeration to say that the musicality and elegance of her work was and still is a major inspiration for me. Joyce has said that “Poetry is so vivid and sleek–like a race car. No extra words. I love using image and metaphor; it’s such a powerful way of explaining your thoughts and feelings.” And that love of language is so very evident in gems like this free verse poem in Eureka! Poems about Inventors — a poem that has stayed with me for years.

EUREKA: POEMS ABOUT INVENTORS by Joyce Sidman

The imagery in this poem blows me away. Talk about “seiz[ing] the bright, dripping shape of an idea”!
And speaking of ideas, who can resist these surprising yet entirely apt instructions for approaching a new idea, from The World According to Dog
3k-dog-idea
Joyce’s wonderful musicality is once again evident in “Listen for Me,” one of my favorite poems from Song of the Water Boatman and Other Pond Poems. You can practically sing along with this little peeper!

SONGS OF THE WATER BOATMAN AND OTHER POND POEMS by Joyce Sidman

See what I mean? The lyricism, the repetition, the build of each stanza, the rhythm created by the form itself — gah! It’s not hard to see why this book is not only a Caldecott Honor Book, but also the winner of the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award.

There is so much to love in each new collection. Besides the lyrical lines, I have often been struck by how Joyce plays with form within and between collections. From the inventive concrete poetry in Meow Ruff: A Story in Concrete Poetry (how sweet is that!)

MEOW RUFF by Joyce Sidman

…to this riddle-song in Butterfly Eyes and Other Secrets of the Meadow

BUTTERFLY EYES by Joyce Sidman

…to the apology poems in This Is Just to Say: Poems of Apology and Forgiveness, modeled on the poem by William Carlos Williams

THIS IS JUST TO SAY by Joyce Sidman

…to the glorious free verse in Red Sings from Treetops: a year in colors, there is always a new form to tantalize the eye and a new tune to delight the ear.Red Sings from Treetops by Joyce Sidman

Joyce’s musicality and innate ability to bring fresh perspectives to every subject permeates all of her collections, and Ubiquitous: Celebrating Nature’s Survivors is no exception. Savor the gorgeous language in this poem,”The Lichen We.”

UBIQUITOUS: CELEBRATING NATURE'S SURVIVORS by Joyce Sidman

“As we are now, so we shall be / (if air is clear and water free).” Sigh.

As if that weren’t wonderful enough, Joyce wrote on, relentlessly besieging us with beauty. Her next collection, Dark Emperor and Other Poems of the Night is both a Newbery Honor Book and a Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award Honor Book, obviously because of poems like this:

Joyce Sidman, Dark Emperor

And no one can deny that Joyce has been extremely fortunate when it comes to illustrators, and has been partnered more than once with the likes of Rick Allen, Beckie Prange (Caldecott Honor, Song of the Water Boatman), Beth Krommes, and Pamela Zagarenski (Caldecott Honor, Red Sings from Treetops). In Swirl by Swirl: Spirals in Nature, Beth Krommes gorgeously illustrates the simple but elegant lines

11a-sidman-swirl

…and in What the Heart Knows: Chants, Charms, and Blessings, a departure from Joyce’s nature-inspired work, Pamela Zagarenski once again brings Joyce’s comforting words to colorful life.

12a-sidman-heart-knows

Joyce’s latest offerings continue to stun with their exquisite language and music, as in “Dream of the Tundra Swan” in Winter Bees and Other Poems of the Cold, with its “yodel of flight” and “the sun’s pale wafer, / the crisp drink of clouds” …

13a-sidman-winterbees

…and in the newly released Before Morning, a child’s invocation for a snow day to spend with her family.

14a-sidman-beforemorning

From “Let the air turn to feathers” to “let the sky fill with flurry and flight,” it’s clear that Joyce has brought us another song that will ensure that her poetry will be as enduring as the creatures she writes about, and that she’ll be making kids’ hearts sing for a long, long time.

 

NCTE Medal - designed by Karla Kuskin

Lucky for us, Joyce has more poetry coming soon, including the 2017 release of ROUND (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), a child’s exploration of things in nature that are round. We can’t wait! In the meantime, Lee’s reflections on Joyce shed light on what inspires this poet and on the many gifts she has already given us!

LEE BENNETT HOPKINS on JOYCE SIDMAN

In Her Own Words: Joyce Sidman on

Poetry and Writing

“Poetry to me is a sculpture of words, carefully constructed to affect the reader’s mind, body, and soul.”

“The natural world, animals, color, the senses, dogs . . . all these things inspire me. I think underneath it is a quest to discover joy and beauty—even if it means wading through darkness and fear—and then write about it as exactly as I can.” (NCTE profile by Barbara A. Ward and Terrell A. Young)

from RED SINGS FROM TREETOPS

from RED SINGS FROM TREETOPS

“I firmly believe that everyone needs ‘pondering time.’ Time alone, without noise and distraction. This is when ideas come–when things sort themselves out, when you see visions and solutions. Not just for writing, but for life.” (from the author’s website)

“I’ve always been fascinated by words of power, the ones that make you shiver when you hear them. The ones that feel so right, so weighty, that the air seems to tremble around them. Words that can change the way you feel, understand. Words that give you courage. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to have a book of words like that to turn to in times of need?”

from BUTTERFLY EYES AND OTHER SONGS FROM THE MEADOW

from BUTTERFLY EYES AND OTHER SONGS FROM THE MEADOW

Poets have to be watchers, seeing the tiny details of their surroundings so they can build poems with them. So I look everywhere: examining this, considering that.” (NCTE profile by Barbara A. Ward and Terrell A. Young)

from UBIQUITOUS

from UBIQUITOUS

Advice for Budding Poets

“Read lots of poetry! Experiment with different forms. Instead of writing for some nameless child, write for yourself. Write for the child you were and still are.” (NCTE profile by Barbara A. Ward and Terrell A. Young)

from SWIRL BY SWIRL: SPIRALS IN NATURE

from SWIRL BY SWIRL: SPIRALS IN NATURE

Teaching Poetry to Children

“Poetry is just another kind of magic—turning one thing into another. Kids only need a slight nudge to realize the power of metaphor and sensory detail. And so many things are waiting in their hearts to be expressed! Kids need to write poetry as well as read it in order to truly understand its power. Have fun, and choose the poems that you love best as your writing models. Your students will catch your excitement.” (NCTE profile by Barbara A. Ward and Terrell A. Young)

from BEFORE MORNING

from BEFORE MORNING

Bonus Video!

Here is Joyce’s creepy-crawly reading of her poem “The Ants” from her book Ubiquitous: Celebrating Nature’s Survivors.

ants

NCTE Medal - designed by Karla Kuskin

More about Joyce Sidman

Poet Joyce SidmanDates: b. 1956 in Connecticut
Education: Wesleyan University (BA German)
Occupation(s): Writer and poet; teacher
Recognition: 2013 NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children, Newbery Honor, authored two Caldecott Honor books, Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, Claudia Lewis Poetry Award, and many other book awards
First book published: Just Us Two: Poems about Animal Dads (Millbrook Press, 2000)

NCTE Medal - designed by Karla Kuskin

WINNERS of the NCTE AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN POETRY FOR CHILDREN

(First links go to NCTE articles about each winner; second links go to NWR video posts)
(Criteria for award)

2015 – Marilyn Singer
2013 – Joyce Sidman
2011 – J. Patrick Lewis  |  See Pat’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
2009 – Lee Bennett Hopkins  |  See Lee’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
2006 – Nikki Grimes  |  See Nikki’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
2003 – Mary Ann Hoberman  |  See Mary Ann’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
2000 – X.J. Kennedy  |  See X.J.’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1997 – Eloise Greenfield  | See Eloise’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1994 – Barbara Juster Esbensen | See Barbara’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1991 – Valerie Worth  |  See Valerie’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1988 – Arnold Adoff  |  See Arnold’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1985 – Lilian Moore  |  See Lilian’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1982 – John Ciardi  |  See John’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1981 – Eve Merriam  |  See Eve’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1980 – Myra Cohn Livingston  |  See Myra’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT on NWR
1979 – Karla Kuskin  |  See Karla’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1978 – Aileen Fisher  |  See Aileen’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR
1977 – David McCord  |  See David’s NCTE SPOTLIGHT post on NWR

NCTE Medal - designed by Karla Kuskin

NCTE Medal – designed by Karla Kuskin

NEXT IN THE SERIES: MARILYN SINGER

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All poems © Joyce Sidman. All illustrations © by respective illustrators. All rights reserved. Video and post content © Renée M. LaTulippe. All rights reserved.

See more poems in my poetry video library.

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18 Comments

  1. Teresa Robeson
    5 months ago

    Joyce’s words truly do make me shiver! I love a lot of poetry that makes me laugh, but Joyce’s poems go deeper than that. They paint pictures in my mind as indelible as any real pigment and take my breath away. Thanks so much for spotlighting her in this installment, Renee!

    Reply

  2. B.J. Lee
    5 months ago

    Such a wonderful post, Renee, Lee and Joyce, of course! Joyce was one of my first poetic influences, along with Alice Schertle, and I love her books to death!

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      5 months ago

      One of my first inspirations too, B.J. And I believe Alice Schertle was Joyce’s inspiration. 🙂

      Reply

  3. Iza Trapani
    5 months ago

    I’m a big Joyce Sidman fan! Love learning more about her. THanks, Lee and Renee!

    Reply

  4. Matt Forrest Esenwine
    5 months ago

    Joyce has such a unique way of identifying and spotlighting the wondrous and marvelous in all things…and then choosing the perfect words. I have yet to see ‘Before Morning,’ but the samples I’ve seen look fantastic – not only her poetry, but the lithograph-style illustrations are very Escher-esque, which I love. Thank you, Renee & Lee, for such an enlightening post!

    Reply

    • Renee M. LaTulippe
      5 months ago

      Yes, I’m also often struck by her surprising yet perfect metaphors and turns of phrase. Lots of “why didn’t I think of that” moments when I read Joyce’s work!

      Reply

  5. Brenda Harsham
    5 months ago

    Her poem is like a necklace, strung with just the right words, each in its place. Great videos, too, Renee. I enjoyed you and Lee reading Joyce’s poetry.

    Reply

  6. Michelle Heidenrich Barnes
    5 months ago

    How can anyone not greet Joyce’s poetry with a sigh and a nod of the head? Beautiful job as always, Renée, showcasing the lyricism, music, and “sleekness” of her work. And I loved your shared recitation with Lee! Only one poet in this series to go… could it be??? Until next year, anyway. Thank you, Renée. Thank you, Lee. And thanks to Joyce for inspiring me again and again.

    Reply

  7. jama
    5 months ago

    Thanks for another wonderful spotlight, Lee and Renee! Joyce’s work leaves me in awe. Enjoyed your reading duet. 🙂

    Reply

  8. Jane @ Raincity Librarian
    5 months ago

    I love that idea of writers just needed to write – it’s an inner need, something they just have to do.

    What an insightful and thorough post!

    Reply

  9. Linda Baie
    5 months ago

    I’ve used Eureka! and Ubiquitous as marvelous mentor texts for sharing research through poetry. What gifts of n-f poetry Joyce Sidman has given us. I have loved and shared Winter Bees with a class at school that raises bees and sells the honey! And most recently added Before Morning to my growing collection of Joyce’s works. Thanks for this, more about her from you and Lee, Renee.

    Reply

  10. Bridget Magee
    5 months ago

    Joyce’s body of work is spectacular. Thanks for reminding me of all of her great titles. Head off to the library now… =)

    Reply

  11. Violet N.
    5 months ago

    So many riches here, Renee. Thanks to you and Lee for this focus on Joyce Sidman. She’s quite amazing, one of my favorites for sure.

    Reply

  12. Linda Mitchell
    5 months ago

    Ah, Renee….what an in-depth labor of love this series is. Now that I’ve discovered Poetry Friday I love coming home after a week of school and enjoying all the contributions. I opened up this entry in your series and thought….oh…I’ll just read this one more before bed. I should have known better! I got caught up in reading ALL the words and now am headed back for ALL the video clips.

    There’s so much to enjoy and learn for readers and writers in this post. Thanks so much for the attention to detail and thoroughness you bring to this series…..it makes me want to take a poetry class again and just use Joyce Sidman poems for mentor texts!

    Wishing you a wonderful weekend with your family.

    Reply

  13. Penny Parker Klostermann
    4 months ago

    Thanks for another wonderful addition to this amazing series. I enjoy learning more about these talented poets. Thanks so much to you and Lee!

    Reply

  14. Charles Waters
    3 months ago

    Oh, I adore me some Joyce Sidman. Sooo talented. DARK EMPEROR is a favorite of mine. Thank you Renee and Lee. Perhaps after highlighting Singer you could highlight Nelson???

    Reply

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