Community Collection 14: OUR YOUNGER SELVES with Elizabeth Acevedo

Welcome to Poetry Month 2018 at No Water River!
Please take a moment to peruse the how-to below, and then dive in! Happy writing — and thank you for helping to build our collection(s)!
Remember: The Community Collections are open indefinitely, so you can visit each post at your leisure to add your poem!

 

Today’s Guest…

is an internationally renowned slam poet, presenter, and educator, as well as a bestselling debut verse novelist whose work is often informed and inspired by her Dominican roots. Please welcome National Slam Champion  …

ELIZABETH ACEVEDO

 

THE POEM

 

THE PROMPT

Write a poem from the point of view of your older self thinking of who you are now. What advice would they give? What observations would they make?

COMMUNITY COLLECTION 14: OUR YOUNGER SELVES

WANT TO ADD YOUR POEM?

1. Paste it into the comment section below. I will gather the poems and add them to this post. OR
2. Email it to me at renee@reneelatulippe.com and I will add it to this post (graphics welcome)!

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THE POET

Elizabeth Acevedo was born and raised in New York City and her poetry is infused with Dominican bolero and her beloved city’s tough grit.

She holds a BA in Performing Arts from The George Washington University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Maryland. Elizabeth has been a featured reader nationally and internationally, including appearances at renowned venues such as Lincoln Center, Madison Square Garden, the Kennedy Center of the Performing Arts, South Africa’s State Theatre, The Bozar in Brussels, the National Library of Kosovo, and many others.

She is a National Slam Champion, Beltway Grand Slam Champion, and the 2016 Women of the World Poetry Slam representative for Washington, D.C, where she lives and works. Her poems have been published or are forthcoming in Poetry, Puerto Del SolCallalooPoet LoreThe Notre Dame Review, and others. Elizabeth is also a Cave Canem Fellow, Cantomundo Fellow, and participant of the Callaloo Writer’s Workshop. She is the author of the chapbook Beastgirl & Other Origin Myths (YesYes Books, 2016) and her debut novel, The Poet X (HarperCollins, 2018). 

Discover more about the author and her books at www.AcevedoWrites.com.

See many of Elizabeth’s slam poetry videos here.

THE BOOKS

THE POET X
Magnificently crafted, Acevedo’s bildungsroman in verse is a stunning account of a teen girl’s path to poetry. Sophomore Xiomara Batista is simultaneously invisible and hyper visible at home, school, and in her largely Dominican community in Harlem—her body is “unhide-able” she tells readers early on, yet she bristles at how others project their desires, insecurities, failures, patriarchal attitudes toward her. Though she is quick to battle and defend herself and her twin brother Xavier, Xiomara’s inner life sensitively grapples with these projections and the expectations of her strict, religious mother.

Acevedo’s depiction of a faith in crisis is exceedingly relatable and teens, especially those going through the sacrament of Confirmation, will deeply appreciate Xiomara’s thoughtful questioning of the Church and how it treats women. Forbidden kisses with a crush and an impromptu performance at an open mic prove to be euphoric, affirming moments for Xiomara: “it’s beautiful and real and what I wanted.”

Acevedo’s poetry is skillfully and gorgeously crafted, each verse can be savored on its own, but together they create a portrait of a young poet sure to resonate with readers long after the book’s end. VERDICT: Truly a “lantern glowing in the dark” for aspiring poets everywhere. All YA collections will want to share and treasure this profoundly moving work. (School Library Journal)

 

BEASTGIRL & OTHER ORIGIN MYTHS
A collection of folkloric poems centered on the historical, mythological, gendered, and geographic experiences of a first generation American woman. From the border in the Dominican Republic, to the bustling streets of New York City, Acevedo considers how some bodies must walk through the world as beastly beings. How these forgotten myths be both blessing and birthright. (from Amazon.com)

 
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CALENDAR OF POETS ~ APRIL 2018

Check out the poetry video library!
“When I Am Old” and prompt copyright © by Elizabeth Acevedo.
Copyright on community collection poems held by authors indicated. All rights reserved.
Other post content © 2018 Renée M. LaTulippe or as indicated. All rights reserved.
Old Photos by Fancycrave via Pexels (no attribution required)

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5 Comments

  1. “So thankful that she didn’t” – The future holds many surprises, and I like that about it, sometimes worries comes, but often wonderful things, too. Thanks for having us consider this, Elizabeth and for another great post, Renee.

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